Windstar Cruise

11 Days - Wildlife & Wines of New Zealand [Lyttlelton (Christchurch) to Auckland]

11 Days - Wildlife & Wines of New Zealand [Lyttlelton (Christchurch) to Auckland]
Starting from $5,699*

Lyttlelton (Christchurch) to Auckland

Ship: Star Breeze

Departure Date : Dec 30 2022

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

Itinerary

Day Lyttelton (Christchurch), New Zealand
Depart 04:00 PM
Known as the "Garden City" because of its beautiful parks and world-renowned gardens, Christchurch is also a vibrant, cosmopolitan city with exciting festivals, theatre, modern art galleries, great shopping and award-winning attractions. Named after the college at the University of Oxford in London, Christchurch is often described as the most English of New Zealand's cities. Located in the city center is Christchurch Cathedral, an outstanding example of Gothic Revival architecture. Other grey-stone nineteenth century buildings, tree-lined avenues and extensive leafy parks give the city its elegant, English atmosphere.
Lyttelton (Christchurch), New Zealand
Day Port Chalmers (Dunedin), New Zealand
Arrive 09:00 AM Depart 05:00 PM
"Much of New Zealand feels like England, by way of Polynesia. There are a few exceptions, though, such as the town of Akaroa, a former French settlement, and the distinctly Scottish city of Dunedin, named after the Scottish Gaelic name for Edinburgh. After Dunedin was founded in 1848, city surveyor Charles Kettle attempted to impose Edinburgh's New Town grid plan on the growing city. But the Otago Peninsula's hilly landscape proved challenging—for evidence, note that Dunedin has one of the world's steepest streets (Baldwin Street). The volcanic remnants around the harbor make for a dramatic backdrop. Dunedin's prominence during the gold rush in the late 19th century resulted in many grand Victorian and Edwardian buildings. Thanks to the beautiful University of Otago (the country's oldest), there's a large student population to keep the city vibrant and modern. But Dunedin's heritage is always proudly on display: The magnificent Dunedin Railway Station and Larnach Castle have been restored to their full glory, and the fascinating Toitu Otago Settlers Museum provides a glimpse into the lives of early residents. Outside the city, the Otago Peninsula is lined with scenic beaches and home to rare birdlife like the royal albatross and yellow-eyed penguin. "
Port Chalmers (Dunedin), New Zealand
Day At Sea

Day Cruising Dusky Sound / Cruising Doubtful Sound
Arrive 07:00 AM / Depart 08:00 PM
Dusky Sound lies among the grand fjords of Fiordland National Park in the southwest part of New Zealand's South Island. Named by Captain Cook when he sailed by at dusk on his first voyage in 1770, this spot holds one of the area's largest fjords, at almost 25 miles long. During the rainy season, you can spot hundreds of waterfalls splashing down from the verdant green hills into the dark deep waters
Day Oban (Halfmoon Bay), New Zealand
Arrive 08:00 AM Depart 05:00 PM
You might not realize that New Zealand has a third island. It hangs beneath the South Island and is just about the last inhabited place before Antarctica. The island itself is only about four percent inhabited, and that is its attraction. It is an unspoiled piece of primeval New Zealand. Oban is a very small town, about 800 souls. The phonebook is printed on a single sheet of A4 paper!
Oban (Halfmoon Bay), New Zealand
Day At Sea

Day Picton, New Zealand
Arrive 08:00 AM Depart 07:00 PM
Tucked into the northeastern end of the South Island—just 29 kilometers (18 miles) north of Bleinheim and 109 kilometers (68 miles) east of Nelson—the petite and picturesque port town of Picton is your starting point for exploring the region of Marlborough. This seaside gateway with ferry service to the North Island connects the majestic maritime beauty known as Queen Charlotte Sound to the luscious wine country of Marlborough, heaven for sauvignon blanc lovers. From the gluttonous to the active, there’s something for everyone, be it traversing a portion of the 70-kilometer (43-mile) stretch of the extraordinary Queen Charlotte Track—New Zealand’s greatest coastal cycleway—on foot or by bike, going on a cycle winery tour or tasting the famous green-lipped mussels that are indigenous to Marlborough Sounds. Naturalists should dust off their binoculars and explore the nearby wildlife sanctuaries, or if inclined to luxury, get up close and personal to a falcon while sipping on a glass of wine at the Brancott Estate.
Picton, New Zealand
Day Wellington, New Zealand
Arrive 07:30 AM Depart 06:00 PM
"New Zealand's cool little capital is located at the southern tip of the North Island, meaning it's blessed with a beautiful waterfront, fresh seafood and unpredictable weather. So famously tempestuous is Windy Welly that visitors quickly learn not to go outside without an umbrella and will spend more time than usual talking about the weather. Politics is a hot topic too, with government workers buzzing about the Beehive, as the distinctive Parliament building is colloquially known. Wellington is also known for culture and cuisine. Learn about Maori history and Kiwiana at Te Papa, the national museum; go behind the scenes of the Lord of the Rings movies made in Wellywood; and wash down a plate of chilled bluff oysters with a crisp sauvignon blanc at a Cuba Street restaurant. Gourmands are spoiled for choice with the city's many coffee microroasteries, craft breweries, innovative chefs and artisanal markets. Fortunately for your waistline, it’s also a terrific city for walking, hiking and cycling, with a compact historic core hugged by green hills and dotted with impossibly perched houses. They say you can't beat Wellington on a good day—but visitors will soon discover that even if it's wet and windy, it's always a good day to be in Wellington. "
Wellington, New Zealand
Day Napier, New Zealand
Arrive 01:00 AM Depart 10:00 PM
The Southern Hemisphere's answer to Miami Beach—at least when it comes to Art Deco architecture—Napier has a perfect mix of natural and manmade beauty. The historic district, which was mostly constructed in the 1930s after a massive earthquake and subsequent fires destroyed the city in 1931, was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2007. As a delicious bonus, there's a thriving food and wine scene, too. Surrounded by the rolling vineyards of the Hawke's Bay wine region and edged by pristine waters, Napier has attracted a host of culinary innovators that has put it on the foodie map over the past two decades. Nature lovers, too, are drawn by this North Island city's scenic splendor and abundant wildlife. Down the coast, colonies of Australasian gannets thrive at Cape Kidnappers. Within the city, Norfolk Island pines line the seafront Marine Parade, a half dozen parks and gardens bloom from September to March (spring and summer Down Under), there are forested hiking trails and active pursuits range from cycling to golf. It's easy to enjoy yourself while soaking up Hawke's Bay's spectacular landscape.
Napier, New Zealand
Day Gisborne, New Zealand
Arrive 08:00 AM Depart 04:00 PM
"Gisborne district lies on the northeastern corner of the central North Island. The only city is Gisborne (population 35,000). Gisborne is about six or seven hours’ drive from Auckland, three hours from Napier to the south and a little longer from Tauranga and Rotorua in the west.

Gisborne District offers some of New Zealand’s best coastal scenery and beaches in uncrowded, often remote settings. The interior is rugged and mountainous bush country which is largely inaccessible except for around beautiful Lake Waikaremoana to the south west. Freedom camping up and down the coast is popular in summer, as are exploring the vineyards, fishing, surfing and generally enjoying the safe and sandy beaches."
Gisborne, New Zealand
Day Tauranga (Rotorua), New Zealand
Arrive 10:00 AM Depart 06:00 PM
"The curved shoreline of the Bay of Plenty—known in Maori as Te Moana-a-Toi—is home to incredible surfing, white-sand beaches and New Zealand's only active marine volcano. Tauranga, with 130,000 residents, is the largest city on the Bay of Plenty and fifth largest in New Zealand. The city offers visitors a number of water-focused activities, like sailing and kayaking, as well as drier alternatives such as shopping and people-watching at a café in the Historic Village. Tauranga is also a great jumping-off point for exploring nearby beaches and Te Puke, the kiwifruit capital of the world, as well as a wealth of Maori cultural sites. The world-famous geothermal wonderland of Rotorua, nicknamed Sulfur City, has been a major Polynesian spa resort town since visitors first arrived in the late 1800s. In Maori, roto means lake and rua means two, but Rotorua actually comprises 18 lakes—plus an incredible redwood forest."
Tauranga (Rotorua), New Zealand
Day Auckland, New Zealand
Arrive 08:00 AM
"New Zealand's biggest city deserves more than a layover. Auckland is multicultural and cosmopolitan, with sizeable Polynesian, Asian and Maori populations enriching its history and broadening the palate. Internationally known chefs and fashion designers have made neighborhoods like Ponsonby, Newmarket and Parnell world-class destinations for shopping and dining.

You're never far from water attractions in New Zealand—and this is especially true in Auckland where it's not unheard of for downtown workers to go kayaking on their lunch break. The once-gritty port has been transformed into inviting public spaces and buzzing nightclubs, with sailboat charters and regular ferry connections waiting to whisk visitors around the harbor for sightseeing.

Start your day sipping a flat white while you plan your explorations: art gallery crawl, winery tour or volcano hike? It's possible to do all three without losing sight of the Sky Tower, one of Auckland's top tourist attractions, from which you can get a bird's-eye view of the gateway to Aotearoa. "
Auckland, New Zealand
 
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